Infographics

For our first project, we were assigned an infographic, which since then I have come to really appreciate.  Infographics range from everything from a nicely design static image to an interactive piece filled with tons of info.  The key to an infographic is to present information, hence the “info” in a graphically appealing way, hence the “graphic.”  With technological advancements, infographics can now present information in ways previously unavailable in years past.  This offers a new opportunity to present information, and lots of it, in an interactive way.  I decided to attack the ever-present and growing national debt.  Because of the breadth and depth of information, I designed it to show the not so gradual rise of our debt by year, compared to it as a percentage of gross domestic produce (GDP).  I incorporated a rollover feature on each year, so you could see the actual debt that year in the defined space.  To utilize the opportunity of interactivity, I incorporated four overlays to compare with the yearly debts.  The first one is who was serving as president during each period of debt.  Next, you can juxtapose the wars in our history.  Lastly, you can overlay who controlled both the Senate and House during each period.  A happy accident occurred when you overlay both the Senate and House, resulting in purple areas where it was a split session.  The flash involved wasn’t necessarily difficult but the sheer quantity of information proved to be extremely time consuming.  Overall, I was very happy with the project.  The one thing I would like to add is the deficit, because that would be a fascinating thing to compare to each period of debt.

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